Working Man Creative | New talent: Arts University Bournemouth 2015 show
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New talent: Arts University Bournemouth 2015 show

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New talent: Arts University Bournemouth 2015 show



92 West is an Omaha Web Design Agency

If you’re looking for the best new graduates for your studio or agency, don’t miss Computer Arts’ New Talent special, issue 243, featuring the team’s handpicked selection of the UK’s best graduates – on sale 24 July 2015.

Arts University Bournemouth invariably boasts a strong line-up of graduate talent, and the literature for the show itself has turned heads too – winning a Brand Impact Award in the Education category last year.

Here, we’ve picked a selection of eight – four each from the BA Graphic Design and BA Illustration courses – from the 2015 show, which is running until 26th June.

Can’t make it to Bournemouth? Be sure to check out the AUB stand at D&AD New Blood next week, and come and say hi to us on the Computer Arts stand too.

01. Grace Parry

John Locke project by Grace Parry
Grace Parry took inspiration from 17th century printing trends, including ornate borders and numbered paragraphs opened with small caps
  • Course: BA (Hons) Graphic Design
  • Project: John Locke: An Essay Concerning Human Understanding

Responding to a brief from the International Society of Typographic Designers (ISTD) to reconsider a key historical text from a typographer’s perspective, Grace Parry chose to present John Locke’s An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1689) as a series of self-contained silk-screened posters.

“I was struck by Locke’s argumentative dismissal of the ancient philosophy of innate ideas and the radical new logical theories he replaced it with,” she explains. “The idea of philosophies overwriting one another over time inspired me to experiment with developing two contrasting typographic voices of the old and new philosophies.”

John Locke project by Grace Parry
Parry used bold lettering and fluorescent colours to convey the radical nature of John Locke’s ideas to a modern audience

For the ‘established concept of innate ideas’, Parry used the calligraphic GT Sectra from Grilli Type, while the ‘philosophy of logic’ was expressed in Simplon from Swiss Typefaces.

02. Liv and Dom Cave Sutherland

Liv & Dom Cave Sutherland
Liv and Dom Cave Sutherland were keen to avoid tired stereotypes about British holidaymakers, and focused on situations where people might take their clothes off
  • Course: BA (Hons) Illustration
  • Project: Observations of the British on holiday

For twin siblings Liv and Dom Cave Sutherland, working collaboratively is second nature – but doing so on a sustained basis on their final-year brief was particularly rewarding.

“Our process usually starts from one of two places: an observation on location or a piece of fabric,” explains Liv. “Characters often jump out from fabrics and furs so starting with swatches is a helpful process for us.”

Ginger on a Beach, by Liv & Dom Cave Sutherland
Ginger on a Beach. The duo were influenced by Martin Parr’s seaside photographs from the 1980s, brought up to date with their own experiences in Bournemouth

The siblings set out to create a body of work that explores how people behave in public settings – “Particularly places where people have the change to get their clothes off,” chuckles Dom.

“We looked at what was expected of people in these settings, then just ran with the boldest ideas we could think of. The aim was to start a brand from this project, and we’ve since set up an online shop.”

03. Matt Reilly

Under The Jersey, by Matt Reilly
Under The Jersey started as a square-format publication, but was changed to an extended rectangle to help emphasise the rise and fall of Armstrong’s career
  • Course: BA (Hons) Graphic Design
  • Project: Under the Jersey

In a response to an ISTD brief to present key milestones in the development of a particular subject or person, Matt Reilly chose disgraced Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong – picking out 10 milestones in his life for his project Under The Jersey.

Under The Jersey, by Matt Reilly
A eight-page-long halftone quote runs through the middle of the book to sum up Lance Armstrong’s story

“My creative process stretched over a seven-month period,” he reveals. “One of the biggest challenges was finding a clear system and set of typographic rules for myself and the book to follow. Another big challenge was typographic detailing and grammar – the only way to overcome this was tedious checking, checking and checking.”

04. Michael Tada